I am experiencing interference

House and signal tracesThere are many potential sources of interference to low-level radio signals, particularly in the urban and suburban environment. With a little care and research, it is generally possible to trace these, and for corrective action to be taken.

Where interference is experienced, you should proceed as follows 

  1. Confirm you are not responsible
  2. Try to identify the source of the interference
  3. Consider speaking to the “owner” of the interfering equipment
  4. Tell the RSGB of your findings they will help prepare your case to Ofcom

Confirm you are not responsible

You should first check that the equipment in your own house is not the source of the interference. EMC Leaflet 4: Locating Sources of Interference to Amateur Radio Reception describes the steps you should take here.

Make a note of the amateur bands affected, and the strength of the interference as indicated on your S-meter. You might also like to record the interference level on some of the short-wave broadcast bands.

Try to identify the source of the interference

This can be tricky. If you have a portable receiver which covers the affected frequencies, see if you can hear the interference on its internal antenna.  If you have a directional antenna associated with your station, try rotating it to peak (or null) the interference. This should give you some idea of the direction of the source. Again EMC Leaflet 4: Locating Sources of Interference to Amateur Radio Reception provides more detailed guidance.

Consider speaking to the “owner” of the interfering equipment

This will depend on your relationship with that person. It may be that you can resolve the problem with a little cooperation from the person concerned. At the very least you will be able to confirm for sure that you have identified the correct source of the problem (remove its power source and make sure the interference ceases). But it may be difficult to go beyond that.

Tell the RSGB of your findings

Submit an interference report to the RSGB by clicking on the button below.


The RSGB cannot investigate every complaint, but may offer advice and assistance in preparing the information to submit to Ofcom. This has to be done in the correct way for it to be recognised as Harmful Interference.

Just as importantly, the database which we build up from problems will help us in our discussions with Ofcom on how to minimise the impact of RFI.

Please note: These pages are intended for members of the Radio Society of Great Britain, but are also available to non-members. Any information is given in good faith and the society cannot be responsible for any misuse or misunderstanding.