RSSGB2RS Headlines

Youngsters’ GB16YOTA on the air

| November 25, 2016

Every December, the IARU organises Youngsters on the Air (YOTA) month, which is a month-long activity specifically aimed at getting young people operating amateur radio. It is not a contest but there is an award to chase. The UK station, GB16YOTA, will be put on the air by Sandringham School ARC on 1 December, Sidmouth […]

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Virtual Buildathon from Chertsey

| November 25, 2016

Chertsey Radio Club will be hosting a Virtual Buildathon starting in December. Bob, M6FLT will be building a kit over a couple of weeks, live on camera, and will be able to answer questions as participants follow him. The kit will be a Kanga Products Fox-3, 40m CW transceiver and k16 keyer kit. Participants buy […]

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Also in GB2RS this week…

| November 25, 2016

It’s with sadness that we report the passing of the long time G3M-P group QSL sub-manager, Gordon Brown, G3MZV. He will be very much missed. The RSGB QSL Bureau is therefore in need of a replacement volunteer for a slightly enlarged and busy group, G3M-S. If you would like to help, have time, space and […]

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FUNcube-3 goes live

| November 18, 2016

The EO-79/FUNcube-3 satellite has transitioned to amateur radio service, now that its primary mission has been completed. AMSAT-UK and AMSAT-NL have announced that the FUNcube U/V transponder has been activated with a regular schedule. Due to power budget constraints, the transponder cannot operate 24/7, so an orbit-specific schedule has been developed. The transponder will commence […]

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472kHz QSO parties soon

| November 18, 2016

If you’re interested in 472kHz, there are two QSO Parties on the horizon. On the 26th and 27th of November it’s QRSS, and on the weekend of the 3rd and 4th of December it’s the turn of CW. Starting with the sunset about 1700UTC, the organiser says that “we’ll keep on QSOing until your eyes […]

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Russian intruder leaves 20m

| November 18, 2016

The International Amateur Radio Union Region 1 Monitoring System reports that the Russian military apparently responded positively to a complaint from German telecommunications authorities to eliminate an intruding signal on 20 metres. The Russian Navy RDL signal from Crimea had been transmitting on 14.180MHz, using F1B at 50 baud and 200Hz shift for several days. […]

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